• Image of Megalithic Monuments Vol.I - Stanton Drew Stone Circle
  • Image of Megalithic Monuments Vol.I - Stanton Drew Stone Circle
  • Image of Megalithic Monuments Vol.I - Stanton Drew Stone Circle
  • Image of Megalithic Monuments Vol.I - Stanton Drew Stone Circle
  • Image of Megalithic Monuments Vol.I - Stanton Drew Stone Circle

Megalithic Monuments Volume I
Title: Stanton Drew Stone Circle
Artists: David Chatton Barker & Ian Humberstone
Format: Ten Inch Gatefold Edition
Contains: 16page Colour Research Booklet & Download Code
Ltd Edition: 250

Our impact on the natural environment is often obvious – plain to see in great sprawling cities, or the dreary greys of industry and infrastructure. Human hands have worked the landscape in subtler, more sympathetic ways too. Old field-systems, hedgerows and pathways often work with natural features rather than against them, and are all the more pleasing to the eye for doing so. Yet there are other built artefacts that, in their hoary and lichened age, have attained such a harmony with their surroundings one hardly thinks of them as manmade at all: the megalithic monuments.

Today, these prehistoric stone circles, menhirs and cists sit in perfect balance with their surroundings, settled into a deep natural sympathy by the passing millennia. Many are aligned with the celestial cycles of the sun and moon, so that this sympathy often extends skyward too, connecting terra firma and firmament as one. As such they are spots that encourage us to extend our gaze beyond the everyday, to dwell on mysteries ancient and new: earth and space, space and time, time and non-time.

Folklore Tapes have long been fascinated by these sites. Now, through artistic practice and research, the collective seek to unearth their hidden wonders, to peel back the lichen-layers, brush aside the creepy crawlies and peer deep into their ageless faces. The first instalment in the new Megalithic Monuments series takes us to Stanton Drew and its prehistoric remains.

Stanton Drew Stone Circle was recorded entirely onsite at the Great Circle at Stanton Drew on August 31 st 2015. Included on the record is a performance of the rare poem ‘The Petrified Wedding’ (read by a passing local and accompanied by a stone-derived music-box composition), as well as two suites created by interactions between various sound devices and the megaliths themselves – ‘Sonic Lithography’ (inspired by a stone xylophone instrument from the Lake District) and ‘Stone Tape’ (incorporating analog processing to manipulate the audio and reveal its hidden qualities).

The 10” vinyl record comes in a gatefold sleeve. The accompanying full-colour booklet includes 35mm and slide photography degraded using organic material found onsite, as well as all the usual research and field notes.

Stanton Drew Stone Circle from David Chatton Barker on Vimeo.

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